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Port Washington Fire Department

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Love it

That's cool. Whoever did that pumpkin did a very nice job

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Please make sure you have the number before needing the number!

If you would like phone stickers please visit our HQ Monday - Friday 8am-4pm or visit any of our other firehouse locations.
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Please make sure you have the number before needing the number!

If you would like phone stickers please visit our HQ Monday - Friday  8am-4pm or visit any of our other firehouse locations.

The Port Washington Fire Department suffers from a 2nd loss of a member within 1 week...

The Chiefs office along with the officers and members of the Fire Medic Co. No1 regret to announce the passing of 40 year and Charter member Carol Swiacki. Widow of Fire Medic Ex-Captain Daniel Swiacki, and mother of Ex-Captain Dennis Swiacki of the Protection Engine Co. No. 1, PWFD, LINY and Fire Medic Exempt member Carol Marie Convey.
She will be reposing at the Knowles Funeral Home on Tuesday October 15th and Wednesday October 16th from 2-4pm and 7-9pm. Department services will be held on Wednesday October 16th, 8pm in Class A uniform. Funeral mass will be held Thursday October 17th at St. Peter’s Church, 9:30am. *The Chiefs Office*
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The Port Washington Fire Department suffers from a 2nd loss of a member within 1 week...

The Chiefs office along with the officers and members of the Fire Medic Co. No1 regret to announce the passing of 40 year and Charter member Carol Swiacki. Widow of Fire Medic Ex-Captain Daniel Swiacki, and mother of Ex-Captain Dennis Swiacki of the Protection Engine Co. No. 1, PWFD, LINY and Fire Medic Exempt member Carol Marie Convey.
She will be reposing at the Knowles Funeral Home on Tuesday October 15th and Wednesday October 16th from 2-4pm and 7-9pm. Department services will be held on Wednesday October 16th, 8pm in Class A uniform. Funeral mass will be held Thursday October 17th at St. Peter’s Church, 9:30am. *The Chiefs Office*

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So sorry to hear of Mrs Swiacki's passing. Hugs to Carol and Daniel and the rest of the swiacki family and to the Port Washington Fire Department.

May they Rest In Peace. God Bless them for their dedication to our community.

Rest in peace Carol. Thank you for all you have taught me at the beginning of my EMS career.

Condolences to the Swiacki family

Sorry to hear sad news..Thank you for how you cared for others and so special to Port..God Bless.

Sorry to hear and news.. Rest in peace our condolences for the Family!!!🙏

Very sad to hear this. Rest In Peace. I am honored to have known you. Eternal Rest to you. Condolences to your family.

Sad news to a very special person to the community and Fire Department .

Such a leader and example for the fire medic family! Will be missed

So so sorry... Rest In Peace ....

Sorry to hear this RIP Carol 🙏🏻

Our sincere condolences to the Swiacki-Convey Family. Our thoughts and prayers are with you on the loss of Carol. Rest In Peace 🙏

R.I.P. SISTER

What a sweet woman, she was. Always had a smile and positive attitude. May you rest you rest easy, Carol. Condolences to your family and the PWFD

I took my original EMT class with Kay Perro down at Port Washington Fire House in the early 80s and I remember Carol from then

I am saddened to learn of Carols passing. Rest in Peace🙏🏻

Rest in Peace Carol. We love and will miss you..GOD Bless the family. I am sure Dan was there to greet you with open arms...

Very sorry. Condolences for the family

So so sorry to hear about Carol. She was such beautiful inside and out

I'm sorry to learn of her passing. Rest in Peace.

RIP THANKS FOR YOUR SERVICE

My condolences to the Family! May She Rest In Peace

We know that God welcomed you to his kingdom. We were very lucky as kids and as adults to have such a beautiful lady as you for a family friend.

Very sad news. RIP Carol. My condolences to the family.

So very sorry to learn of Carol’s passing. Rest in the Arms of the Lord Carol, He knows how special you were.💔😢🙏

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Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips


What is carbon monoxide?

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an invisible, odorless gas. It is a common by-product of incomplete combustion, produced when fossil fuels (like oil, gas or coal) burn. Because you can't see, taste or smell it, carbon monoxide can kill you before you know it's there. Exposure to lower levels over time can make you sick.

Where does carbon monoxide come from?

Carbon monoxide can be produced by the combustion that occurs from fossil fuel burning appliances like a furnace, clothes dryer, range, oven, water heater, or space heater. When appliances and vents work properly, and there is enough fresh air in your home to allow complete combustion, the trace amounts of CO produced are typically not dangerous. And normally, CO is safely vented outside your home.
Problems may arise when something goes wrong. An appliance can malfunction, a furnace heat exchanger can crack, vents can clog, or debris may block a chimney or flue. Fireplaces, wood burning stoves, gas heaters, charcoal grills, or gas logs can produce unsafe levels of CO if they are unvented or not properly vented. Exhaust can seep into the home from vehicles left running in an attached garage. All these things can cause a CO problem in the home.

Why is carbon monoxide so dangerous?

Carbon Monoxide robs you of what you need most: oxygen, which is carried to your cells and tissue by the hemoglobin in your blood. If you inhale CO, it quickly bonds with hemoglobin and displaces oxygen. This produces a toxic compound in your blood called carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). Carboxyhemoglobin produces flu-like symptoms, for example: headaches, fatigue, nausea, dizzy spells, confusion, and irritability. Since symptoms are similar to the flu, carbon monoxide poisoning can be misdiagnosed. As levels of COHb rise, victims suffer vomiting, loss of consciousness, and eventually brain damage or death.


Who is at risk from carbon monoxide poisoning?

Everyone is at risk because everyone needs oxygen to survive. Medical experts believe some people maybe more vulnerable to CO poisoning: unborn babies, infants, children, seniors, and people with heart and lung problems due to higher metabolic rates.


How can I help protect against carbon monoxide poisoning?


Having an early warning is important. Install carbon monoxide alarms outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association. Choose a CO alarm that is tested and listed by a Nationally Accredited Lab such as ETL or UL.

Have your appliances checked regularly. Have a qualified appliance technician check all fossil fuel burning appliances, venting and chimney systems at least once a year, or as recommended by the manufacturer.

It is critical to identify potential dangers and take measures to help protect against this serious threat. We recommend following these guidelines:

* Have fuel-burning heating equipment and chimneys inspected by a qualified professional every year before cold weather arrives. During the heating season, clear filters and filtering systems of dust and dirt.
* Be sure to open the flue for adequate ventilation when using a fireplace.
* Inspect the pilot lights on natural gas appliances to ensure that the flame is blue. When a flame is mostly yellow in color, it likely is producing CO.
* Clean out the lint and debris that may build up in the clothes dryer vent which leads to the outside of the house.
* Only use generators in a well-ventilated location outdoors away from windows, doors and vent openings.
* Use barbecue grills only outside and never indoors or in the garage.
* Never leave a car running in a garage, even for a couple of minutes even if the overhead garage door is open.
* Install a CO alarm outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement, as recommended by the NFPA. Ensure that the alarms are plugged all the way in the outlet or, if battery operated, have working batteries installed. For better protection go a step further and install CO alarms inside each sleeping area.
* Port Washington Fire Department recommends replacing CO alarms no later than every 5-7 years.

Exposure to carbon monoxide is most commonly accompanied by the following symptoms:
1. Headache
2. Dizziness
3. Nausea
4. Flu-like symptoms, fatigue
5. Shortness of breath on exertion
6. Impaired judgment
7. Chest pain
8. Confusion
9. Depression
10. Hallucinations
11. Agitation
12. Vomiting
13. Abdominal pain
14. Drowsiness
15. Visual changes
16. Fainting
17. Seizure
18. Memory problems
19. Walking problems
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Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

 
What is carbon monoxide?
 
Carbon monoxide (CO) is an invisible, odorless gas. It is a common by-product of incomplete combustion, produced when fossil fuels (like oil, gas or coal) burn. Because you cant see, taste or smell it, carbon monoxide can kill you before you know its there. Exposure to lower levels over time can make you sick.
 
Where does carbon monoxide come from?
 
Carbon monoxide can be produced by the combustion that occurs from fossil fuel burning appliances like a furnace, clothes dryer, range, oven, water heater, or space heater. When appliances and vents work properly, and there is enough fresh air in your home to allow complete combustion, the trace amounts of CO produced are typically not dangerous. And normally, CO is safely vented outside your home.
Problems may arise when something goes wrong. An appliance can malfunction, a furnace heat exchanger can crack, vents can clog, or debris may block a chimney or flue. Fireplaces, wood burning stoves, gas heaters, charcoal grills, or gas logs can produce unsafe levels of CO if they are unvented or not properly vented. Exhaust can seep into the home from vehicles left running in an attached garage. All these things can cause a CO problem in the home.
 
Why is carbon monoxide so dangerous?
 
Carbon Monoxide robs you of what you need most: oxygen, which is carried to your cells and tissue by the hemoglobin in your blood. If you inhale CO, it quickly bonds with hemoglobin and displaces oxygen. This produces a toxic compound in your blood called carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). Carboxyhemoglobin produces flu-like symptoms, for example: headaches, fatigue, nausea, dizzy spells, confusion, and irritability. Since symptoms are similar to the flu, carbon monoxide poisoning can be misdiagnosed. As levels of COHb rise, victims suffer vomiting, loss of consciousness, and eventually brain damage or death.
 

Who is at risk from carbon monoxide poisoning?
 
Everyone is at risk because everyone needs oxygen to survive. Medical experts believe some people maybe more vulnerable to CO poisoning: unborn babies, infants, children, seniors, and people with heart and lung problems due to higher metabolic rates.
 
 
How can I help protect against carbon monoxide poisoning?

 
Having an early warning is important. Install carbon monoxide alarms outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement, as recommended by the National Fire Protection Association. Choose a CO alarm that is tested and listed by a Nationally Accredited Lab such as ETL or UL.
 
Have your appliances checked regularly. Have a qualified appliance technician check all fossil fuel burning appliances, venting and chimney systems at least once a year, or as recommended by the manufacturer.
 
It is critical to identify potential dangers and take measures to help protect against this serious threat.  We recommend following these guidelines:
 
*  Have fuel-burning heating equipment and chimneys inspected by a qualified professional every year before cold weather arrives. During the heating season, clear filters and filtering systems of dust and dirt.
*  Be sure to open the flue for adequate ventilation when using a fireplace.
*  Inspect the pilot lights on natural gas appliances to ensure that the flame is blue. When a flame is mostly yellow in color, it likely is producing CO.
*  Clean out the lint and debris that may build up in the clothes dryer vent which leads to the outside of the house.
*  Only use generators in a well-ventilated location outdoors away from windows, doors and vent openings.
*  Use barbecue grills only outside and never indoors or in the garage.
*  Never leave a car running in a garage, even for a couple of minutes even if the overhead garage door is open.
*  Install a CO alarm outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement, as recommended by the NFPA. Ensure that the alarms are plugged all the way in the outlet or, if battery operated, have working batteries installed. For better protection go a step further and install CO alarms inside each sleeping area.
*           Port Washington Fire Department recommends replacing CO alarms no later than every 5-7 years.

Exposure to carbon monoxide is most commonly accompanied by the following symptoms:
1. Headache
2. Dizziness
3. Nausea
4. Flu-like symptoms, fatigue
5. Shortness of breath on exertion
6. Impaired judgment
7. Chest pain
8. Confusion
9. Depression
10. Hallucinations
11. Agitation
12. Vomiting
13. Abdominal pain
14. Drowsiness
15. Visual changes
16. Fainting
17. Seizure
18. Memory problems
19. Walking problemsImage attachment

Smoke alarms save lives!

Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out.
Here's what you need to know!

* A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home.

* Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound.

* Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.

* Test your smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.

* Today’s smoke alarms will be more technologically advanced to respond to a multitude of fire conditions, yet mitigate false alarms.

* When a smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside.

* Replace all smoke alarms in your home every 10 years.
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Smoke alarms save lives!

Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. 
Heres what you need to know!

* A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. 

* Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound. 

* Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.

* Test your smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.

* Today’s smoke alarms will be more technologically advanced to respond to a multitude of fire conditions, yet mitigate false alarms.

* When a smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside.

* Replace all smoke alarms in your home every 10 years.
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